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Lengua inglesa
folderol see falderal


folding pronunciación
adjective referring to something that can be folded away so that it takes up less space a folding chair a folding bed .
noun
1 a fold or plait.
2 geol the bending of strata, usually as the result of compression.


folding money
noun , colloq paper money.


foldout
noun a large page, eg containing a diagram or illustration, which is folded to fit into a book, and is unfolded when used. Also called gatefold.


foley artist
noun , cinematog a person whose job is to add sound effects to a film after shooting.
[20c: named after Jack Foley (1891?1967), who devised the process for doing this]


foliaceous pronunciación
adjective
1 consisting of or resembling leaves; leaflike.
2 geol composed of thin leaflike or platelike layers of minerals.
[17c: from Latin foliaceus , from folium leaf]


foliage pronunciación
noun
1 the green leaves on a tree or plant.
2 sprays of leaves used for decoration.
[15c: from French feuillage , from feuille leaf; influenced by Latin folium leaf]


foliage plant
noun a plant grown for the beauty of its foliage.


foliate
adjective leaflike or having leaves.
verb (foliated , foliating )
1 to cover with metal in leaf form or foils.
2 to hammer (metal) into thin sheets.
3 to mark the leaves or folios (not pages) of a book, etc with consecutive numbers. Compare paginate.
4 intr said of a plant: to grow leaves.
5 to decorate (especially Gothic architecture) with ornamental leaf carving.
[17c: from Latin foliatus leafy]


folic acid
noun , biochem a member of the vitamin B complex found in many foods, especially liver and green leafy vegetables, which is required for the manufacture of DNA and RNA and the formation of red blood cells, deficiency of which causes anaemia and retarded growth.
[1940s: from Latin folium leaf (because of its presence in green leaves)]


folie à deux Fr
noun , pathol a form of mental illness in which two people, generally close to one another, share the same delusion.
[19c: French]


folie de grandeur Fr
noun , pathol a form of mental illness characterized by a delusion that one possesses wealth, beauty or irresistible charms.
[20c: French]


folio
noun (folios )
1 a leaf of a manuscript, etc, numbered on one side.
2 printing a page number in a book.
3 a body of written work, etc, submitted as part of an examination Your English folio must be completed by March .
4 hist
a a sheet of paper folded once to make two leaves for a book;
b a book of the largest size, composed of such sheets.
5 old use a folder.
as adjective a folio edition .
[16c: from Latin folium leaf]


folk
plural noun
1 people in general.
2 (also colloq folks) one's family Her folk are from Edinburgh going to visit the folks .
3 people belonging to a particular group, nation or tribe country folk .
singular noun , colloq folk music a folk and blues festival .
adjective traditional among, or originating from, a particular group of people or nation folk music a folksong folk art .
[Anglo-Saxon folc ]


folk art
noun handicrafts, especially pottery, wood-carvings, textiles and basketware, produced by local craftsmen with no formal training, usually employing traditional techniques, patterns and designs.


folk etymology
noun a popular, unscientific, and usually erroneous, attempt to explain the origin of a word.


folk hero
noun a hero in the eyes of a particular group of people.


folk memory
noun a memory of an event that survives in a community through many generations.


folk music
noun
1 traditional music which is handed down orally from generation to generation within a particular area or group of people.
2 contemporary music of a similar style.


folk song
noun any song originating among the people and traditionally handed down orally from generation to generation.
folk singer noun .


folk tale or folk story
noun a popular story handed down by oral tradition from generation to generation.


folk-weave
noun a loosely woven fabric.


folkie
noun , colloq
1 someone who enjoys listening to folk music.
2 someone who enjoys playing or singing folk music; a folk musician.
[1960s]


folklore
noun
1 the customs, beliefs, stories, traditions, etc of a particular group of people, usually passed down orally.
2 the study of these.
[19c]
folkloric adjective .
folklorist noun someone who studies folklore.


folksy
adjective (folksier , folksiest )
1 simple and homely, especially in an over-sweet or twee way.
2 everyday; friendly; sociable; unpretentious.
[19c: originally US]
folksiness noun .


follicle pronunciación
noun
1 anat a small cavity or sac within a tissue or organ, eg the pit surrounding the root of a hair hair follicle Graafian follicle .
2 bot a fruit formed from a single carpel, containing several seeds, which splits along one side when mature.
[17c: from Latin folliculus a small bag or sack, diminutive of follis bellows]
follicular or folliculose adjective .


follicle-stimulating hormone
noun (abbreviation FSH) physiol a hormone, secreted by the pituitary gland in vertebrates, which in mammals stimulates the growth of the ovarian follicles (in females) (see Graafian follicle) and the production of sperm (in males).


follow pronunciación
verb (followed , following )
1 tr & intr (also follow after someone) to go or come after them, either immediately or shortly afterwards.
2 to accompany someone; to go with them.
3 to secretly go after someone to find out what they are doing; to pursue stealthily.
4 to accept someone as leader or authority.
5 intr (sometimes follow from something) to result from it; to be a consequence of it It follows that John will arrive around 2pm .
6 to go along (a road, etc), alongside (a river, etc) or on the path marked by (signs).
7 to watch someone or something as they or it move His eyes followed her up the street .
8 to do something in a particular way; to practise it follow a life of self-denial follow a trade .
9 to conform to something follows a familiar pattern .
10 to obey (advice, etc).
11 tr & intr to copy follow her example .
12 tr & intr to understand Do you follow me?
13 to read (a piece of writing or music) while listening to a performance of it.
14 to take a keen interest in (a sport, etc) Fiona avidly follows football .
[Anglo-Saxon folgian ]
as follows as announced immediately after this, or shown in the text below.
follow suit
1 cards to play a card of the same suit as the one which is leading for that hand.
2 to do what someone else has done without thinking much about it.
follow on cricket said of a side: to play a follow-on.
follow on from someone to start where they left off.
follow something out to carry out (eg instructions) fully, or to their required conclusion.
follow through or follow something through tennis , golf to continue the action of (a stroke) after hitting the ball. See also follow-through.
follow something through or up to pursue (an idea, a project, etc) beyond its early stages, and often to fruition; to investigate or test it.
follow something up to take the next step after a particular procedure followed up their investigations with a detailed report . See also follow-up.


follow-on
noun , cricket a second innings batted by the same team immediately after the first, as a result of having scored a particular number of runs less than the opposing team. See follow on under follow.


follow-through
noun
1 tennis , golf the continuation of the swing of a stroke after hitting the ball.
2 snooker , etc a shot that causes the ball to follow the one it has struck.
3 following through; further investigation or testing. See follow through under follow.


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